Weekend Renno Project 3: A Wall of A Different Color

This project actually began with the desire to spice up the kitchen and other parts of the house with a little paint. We grabbed what I’m going to go ahead and call “several” swatches. 1930s green for part of the kitchen, a yellowish neutral for the walls in the living room/kitchen and hallway, a lavender to do accent colors in the asparagus green master bath, a nice blue for the master bedroom… you get the point. Anything we didn’t do this time is totally on the table for future upgrades. Basically, almost every room needs new paint and a once over to de-clutter and reorganize. They’ve lived there for ten years so it just needs a facelift.

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Here you see the selections of color, nothing too bright, and plenty of historic preservation trust heritage colors because her house is literally made of antiques.

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Thanks to Pinterest we had decided on a 1930s green for the kitchen island to make it pop and give it a classic look. We tested it on the inside of one of the cabinets to make sure we had it right. The color needed to blend with cobalt and white Blue Danube dishes, crockery, mid-toned wood, white wainscoting, and Fiestaware colored dishes in lime green, blue, gold, and red. I cheated and went with a similar but not exactly the same color to the inside front doors and pantry door.
A side note: the pantry door perfectly matches the exterior garage door at our great aunt’s house and was non-negotiable so why not go with the flow.

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Checking it vs. the dishes. It’s never a bad idea to try this before you go nuts with a color. Also remember in the kitchen you want enamel paint in either semigloss or gloss because it’s going to take a beating.

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The front bar looks great and really adds a nice pop to the space with its solid block of color now. We also painted the bookshelves on the ends of the island and the cabinets on the back of the island. I will load pics of that at a later date because I forgot to take them (oops).

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Then there were the walls. The wall color had the same constraints as the color for the cabinets. We knocked it out of the park with Historic Preservation Trust Hubble House Harvest Maize. This color looks awesome no matter the lighting-it’s yellow, it’s golden, it’s a neutral, it’s just really cool and I tried to capture it in several of the pics below-let’s see how I do.

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We only had to use one coat because the previous color was an off white you will see at the bottom of this post in a before and after shot, and we used a paint and primer in one. I’d been told these didn’t really work very well. Poppycock! I wouldn’t use them on covering a super bright or a super dark, but they’re fine.
Note how it brings out the color in the chandelier.

We used a ladder, a Sure Edge edger (they’re awesome, buy one now) a roller, and a 1.5″ synthetic art brush for the finer details. With three people, it took about 3 hours to do the living room, the hall, the breakfast nook, and the kitchen. Not bad, eh. Afterwards I rearranged the wall deco to make it look more up to date and fabulous and here’s what we came up with:

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The top of the hutch looks classy with some of the crockery collection which now reflects the painting above, and note in this pic how the wall looks like a yellowy khaki.

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I upgraded the mantle to reflect his crockery collection, her pharmacy antiques collection, their chicken motif, and left the background crocks and mortar and pestle painting that they insisted stay on the mantle. A very Pottery Barn look but with all authentic antiques.

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This was another fun project. Each of the frames has a hand-written recipe from family members-his grandmother and mother, her grandmother and great aunts. We moved these on the wall to reflect the interesting window shape.
Note in this pic how the yellow looks bright and cheerful.

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One side of the hallway leading to the breezeway. I simplified their wall deco, removing several items and using the unified theme of the chicken/rooster to make the space less busy. At the end of the hall, there are three antique cabbage slicers which again represent a collection and have a unified theme.

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I removed 4 or 5 things on this side of the hall, kept with the rooster theme, and reflected some blue (a theme heavy in the living room and kitchen with the cobalt glassware, Blue Danube dishes, and blue stamps and lines on the crockery) into this space to reinforce the unity of the wall color.
Note the other two cabbage slicers, the antique door to the pantry, and how the wall color looks in this picture.

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The impressive front doors, reflecting the green on the pantry and now the kitchen island. Note the cohesion with the clocks, the antique Civil War bayonet over the door, and how neutral the wall color looks in low light (I took this picture at night).

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It’s all in the details, this quilt scrap had languished with a white background and instead we backed it with a fun teal linen we snagged from the remnant bin at Hancock’s for $2.00 to really make it pop.

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The before, I forgot to mention that we also refinished the floor over the weekend, that’s why it’s so shiny, and we had already redone the pot rack, but this is the original wall color and shelf/mantle deco.

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Updated with the pop from the new wall color, reorganized shelving to be more reflective of the family, a family centered mantle, and the furniture. Doesn’t it look fabulous?

How’d We Do Costwise?
The paint was $40, for a high-end primer/paint for the walls and the enamel for the kitchen.
The labor was FREE because we did it ourselves.
The paint supplies cost about $20 for the edger, edger refills, a roller tray, some new rollers, and a roller tray insert.
The deco redo was FREE because we just moved around things they already owned.
We did pay $2.00 for the remnant fabric for the quilt piece.
With Tax, Walls and Deco Came In Under $75.00!

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